Discussion:
The Absolutely 100% True Cross My Heart and Hope to Die True Story about the death of JFK
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Sam Sloan
2005-10-29 16:57:24 UTC
Permalink
The Absolutely 100% True Cross My Heart and Hope to Die True Story
about the death of JFK

My conscious has been bothering me all these years about this
incredible secret that only I who is still alive know. Now I must
clear my conscious and finally reveal how JFK died.

Here is what really, truly happened.

Warren G. Harding was elected President in 1920. Shortly after taking
office, Harding appointed J. Edgar Hoover as Assistant Director of the
Bureau of Investigation. Prior to that time, the previous director had
been involved in a major scandal by arresting and prosecuting
political opponents for political gain. Hoover, a man of low birth and
unknown parentage, was a low level bureaucrat untouched by this
scandal and thus rose quickly to a high position over his disgraced
superiors.

However, Harding soon tired of Hoover and decided to fire him.

Hoover found out that Harding was about to fire him and thus contacted
International Chess Master and notorious criminal Norman T. Whitaker,
who lived near to the FBI Headquarters in Washington DC. Hoover knew
that if Harding died in Washington it would raise speculation that
Hoover was involved, and so devised a clever ruse to cover up what
really happened. Hoover dispatched Whitaker to play in the Western
Open Chess Championship (now known as the US Open Championship) in San
Francisco where Harding would be staying.

The 1923 Western Open Championship was hotly contested. The best two
players were Whitaker and Samuel D. Factor. What nobody realized was
that Whitaker had been conducting a sexual affair with Harding's wife,
and for that reason Whitaker had rented an apartment on M Street near
the White House. Harding's wife, Florence Kling, knew that her husband
had been conducting numerous affairs and had even fathered an
illegitimate child and so in retaliation she had taken up with
Whitaker.

The big game to decide the US Open Chess Championship took place at
the Mechanics Institute Chess Club at 57 Post Street in San Francisco.
As the game progressed, Whitaker made a good move that he knew would
give Factor a lot of trouble. After pressing Factors clock and Factor
started to think, Whitaker snuck out of the chess room on the pretext
of going to put money into the parking meter and instead went across
the street to the Palace Hotel where Harding was sleeping. By prior
arrangement, Florence Harding let Whitaker into her hotel room where
President Harding was sleeping. Whitaker poisoned Harding. With
Harding certain to die within a few hours, Whitaker went back across
the street to the Mechanics Institute only to discover that Factor was
still thinking about his chess move. Factors clock was still running
and nobody had even noticed that Whitaker had left the room, much less
gone across the street and killed the President of the United States.
Unfortunately, Whitaker had been so distracted by his murder of
Harding that he made a bad move a few moves later and lost the game.

Thus, when President Harding died on August 2, 1923, Whitaker had the
prefect alibi because he had been playing a tournament chess game
across the street and nobody had even noticed him leaving the room.
Otherwise a career criminal like Whitaker would have come under
suspicion. Harding's wife of course could never reveal that she had
let Whitaker into her bedroom because to do so would have revealed her
sexual relationship with Whitaker.

However, subsequent presidents suspected that J. Edgar Hoover had
something to do with the death of Harding. Harding had been robust and
healthy up until the time of his death and it was unbelievable that
such a strong man could die so suddenly. Although they never suspected
that Hoover had dispatched Whitaker to kill Harding, they did suspect
that Hoover had something to do with the death of Harding and of
course they knew that Harding had been planning to fire Hoover, and
for that reason every president from then on had been afraid to fire
Hoover. For example, just about everybody in Washington knew that
Hoover had a lover, Clyde Tolson. Such an affair would have caused any
other man to be fired, but Hoover was untouchable.

After the death of Harding, Hoover manufactured evidence against him,
such as associating Harding with the Teapot Dome Scandal. Based upon
this false and manufactured evidence, Harding soon came to regarded as
the worst president the United States ever had. The general public
began to regard the fact that Harding had died under mysterious
circumstances and only his wife had been present at the time of his
death as a blessing. Rumors circulated that his wife had killed him
because of his affairs with other women, but this was overlooked
because it was thought that Harding had been a bad president anyway.

In reality, not only was Harding not the worst president but he was
one of the best. His appointments were fine and distinguished men. His
cabinet included Charles Evans Hughes, Henry C. Wallace and Herbert C.
Hoover. Harding appointed William Howard Taft to the US Supreme Court.
Harding's policies, which were followed by his immediate successors,
led to an unprecedented era of economic prosperity known as the
Roaring Twenties.

His one really bad appointment was J. Edgar Hoover, a man of low birth
and uncertain parentage and probably a fake name. In order to cover up
his murder of Harding by Whitaker, Hoover dispatched a stream of
unfavorable publicity leading the public to believe that Harding had
been a bad president when he really had been good. J. Edgar Hoover
also led the public to believe that Harding had been in poor health at
the time of his death, whereas in reality Harding had been in perfect
health, which helps explain why Harding was alone in his hotel room
with only his wife present when he died.

Their secret seemed safe. However, their cover was nearly blown in
1932 with the Lindbergh kidnapping. Hoover had introduced his friend
Whitaker to FBI Agent Gaston B. Means. By 1932, Means was no longer
working for the FBI but he kept in contact with Whitaker, who lived on
M Street near to the FBI headquarters. Without Hoover's knowledge or
approval, Means and Whitaker concocted a scheme to extort some money
from a wealthy heiress. Means claimed that he was in contact with the
Lindbergh kidnappers who were demanding ransom money. The heiress
agreed to pay the money and Means arranged for Whitaker to pick up the
money. When Hoover found out about this, he was furious, as exposure
of this relationship threatened to uncover the crime of the century,
the murder of Harding nearly a decade earlier. Hoover had both Means
and Whitaker arrested. However, realizing that Whitaker knew the
secret of the murder of Harding, he had Whitaker released after only
18 months in prison. Means died in jail.

http://www.fbi.gov/libref/historic/famcases/lindber/lindbernew.htm

Again, Hoover was safe and no president dared to fire him.

Until JFK was elected President in 1960. JFK was determined to fire
Hoover because of Hoover's involvement in homosexual activity. When
Hoover realized this, he again called upon his friend Whitaker.

Whitaker was in touch with a notorious chess player, Thomas G. Dorsch.
Whitaker had met Dorsch at the 1961 US Open Chess Championship in San
Francisco. From 1923 until 1961, no US Open Chess Championship had
been held in San Francisco and it was almost a coincidence that after
a hiatus of 38 years, it was time for another US Open and also time to
kill another president. Whitaker returned to the scene of the crime,
meeting with Dorsch at the Mechanics Institute Chess Club and then
going across the street to the Palace Hotel to the very room where
President Harding had died, only to find that the walls had been
changed and the room remodeled on orders from J. Edgar Hoover.

As the plot unfolded, Sam Sloan was asleep on his living room couch in
his apartment at 2119 Carleton Street in Berkeley, California. Sloan
had rented a room in that apartment to Tom Dorsch. Bill Wyatt came
into the apartment, saw Sam Sloan asleep, woke Sam up and told him
that the President had been shot. Tom Dorsch walked in a few minutes
later and they turned on the TV and learned the details of the Kennedy
Assassination. Since Tom Dorsch had arrived only a few minutes later,
Sam naturally assumed that Tom had been in the Berkeley area. It never
occurred to Sam that with the wonders of modern air travel, Tom
Dorsch, an Army certified marksman, had been on the grassy knoll and
had shot the president.

Whitaker had driven the getaway car, an unassuming grey Volkswagen
Beetle that nobody had noticed in the frenzy that followed the Kennedy
Assassination. The agreement had been to pick up Oswald at the rear
entrance to the School Book Depository Building, but when Oswald did
not arrive on time at the pick-up point, they had left him in the
lurch. Whitaker drove Dorsch to the airport and put him on a flight to
Oakland and then Whitaker drove to Mexico. As a result, Tom Dorsch was
able to walk in the door to Sam Sloan's apartment in Berkeley
California only a few minutes after Sloan had woken up and learned
that Kennedy had been assassinated.

Knowing that only Sam Sloan knew the true story of how both presidents
Harding and Kennedy had been killed by Whitaker under orders from J.
Edgar Hoover, Dorsch started a disinformation campaign attacking the
credibility of Sloan, alleging an improper relationship between Sloan
and Whitaker whereas in reality it was Dorsch that had had the
improper relationship with Whitaker. In the Summer of 1962, Sam Sloan
had played in a chess tournament in North Carolina. Whitaker was on
crutches, recovering from the automobile accident in 1961 in which his
friend Hartleb had been killed. Sam was planning to hitchhike back to
his home in Lynchburg. Since Whitaker was driving to Washington, he
agreed to drive Sam part way back to Lynchburg. He would let Sam off
and Sam would hitchhike the rest of the way to Lynchburg. Whitaker was
driving the same grey Volkswagen beetle that was later used in the
Kennedy Assassination.

During the ride, Sam finally asked Whitaker what had ever happened to
the money he had gotten from the Lindbergh Kidnapping. Whitaker
replied that he did not know what Means had done with the money and he
wished he did. Whitaker said that, contrary to what has been reported,
he never actually had the money in his hands. Whitaker was angry
because Gaston B. Means had taken not only all the money for the
Lindbergh Kidnapping but for the Harding Assassination as well. Hoover
had paid Means for the Harding Assassination and Means was supposed to
give the money to Whitaker (naturally Hoover did not want to risk
being seen with a career criminal like Whitaker), but Means had kept
the money. When the Lindbergh had deal came up, Whitaker had assumed
that Hoover was in on the plot, as Means had always worked for Hoover.
Whitaker had been surprised that Hoover had not known about the
Lindbergh Kidnapping deal, and had threatened to expose the Harding
plot if Hoover did not let him out of jail.

When Whitaker told Sloan the details of the plot to kill Harding,
Whitaker was in poor health, his mind was not clear and he was
expecting to die soon. However, Whitaker, who was born on April 9,
1890, did not die until May, 1975. By the Summer of 1963, Whitaker
regretted that he had ever told Sloan the truth of what had happened.
When Whitaker hired Tom Dorsch, an Army certified expert sharpshooter
who was later trained by the CIA in Monterey California as a Russian
Language Expert, to kill the president, he told Dorsch that only Sam
Sloan knew the truth of the Assassination of President Harding. This
prompted Dorsch to make friends with Sloan. This would provide Dorsch
with the perfect alibi so that nobody would ever know or even suspect
that Dorsch had killed the president.

Timeline

1. Harding appoints Hoover as Assistant Director of the FBI.

2. Harding is thinking of firing Hoover. Hoover finds out and has
Harding killed in a hotel room in the Sheridan Palace Hotel in San
Francisco, while the US Open Chess Championship is being played across
the street.

3. Subsequent presidents, realizing that Hoover killed Harding, are
afraid to fire Hoover.

4. JFK and RFK do not get along with Hoover. Hoover finds out that JFK
is thinking of firing Hoover, so Hoover has JFK killed too.

5. Hoover dies of AIDS. His secretaries burn all his old papers that
he was using to blackmail all presidents from Harding to Johnson.
(This last part is absolutely true.)

Here is the actual chess game that Whitaker was playing at the very
moment that Harding died. This game was published in the daily
newspaper, the San Francisco Call, in the same edition of that paper
that announced the death of Harding.


[Event "Western Association Championship"]
[Site "San Francisco, Cal."]
[Date "1923.08.02"]
[White "Factor,Samuel D."]
[Black "Whitaker,Norman Tweed"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D64"]

1.d4 e6 2.Nf3 d5 3.c4 Nf6 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.Nc3 Be7 6.e3 O-O 7.Rc1 Re8
8.a3 c6 9.Qc2 a6 10.Bd3 dxc4 11.Bxc4 b5 12.Bd3 c5 13.Bxf6 Nxf6
14.dxc5 Bxc5 15.Ne4 Be7 16.Nxf6+ Bxf6 17.Bxh7+ Kh8 18.Be4 Rb8
19.O-O b4 20.Bc6 bxa3 21.Bxe8 axb2 22.Bxf7 bxc1=Q 23.Rxc1 Qd7
24.Qg6 Rb5 25.Be8 Rc5 26.Re1 Qd8 27.Ba4 Bb7 28.Bc2 Kg8 29.Qh7+
Kf8 30.Rd1 Rd5 31.Nd4 Bxd4 32.exd4 Qg5 33.f4 Qg4 34.h3 Qg3 35.Rd3
Qe1+ 36.Kh2 Qf2 37.Rg3 Qxd4 38.Qh8+ Ke7 39.Rxg7+ Kd6 40.Qb8+ Kc5
41.Rxb7 1-0

I think I will write a book proving all this and get a million ucks.

Sam Sloan
Sam Sloan
2005-10-30 01:35:54 UTC
Permalink
Why doesn't hasn't Tom Dorsch killed you?
Richard
Dear Richard,

The story I wrote is 100% true except for a few small details.

For example, it is 100% absolutely true that Tom Dorsch was an Army
Certified Sharpshooter who was trained at the Army Defense Language
Institute in Monterey California to be a CIA Agent and Russian
Language Specialist.

Dorsch served 20 years in the Army in that capacity. This is a fact.

It is only possibly not true that Dorsch was on the grassy knoll and
that Whitaker drove the getaway car. It is true that Dorsch walked
into my apartment on 2119 Carleton Street in Berkeley just a few
minutes after I had learned that Kennedy had been shot.

It is a fact that President Harding died in a Hotel Room at the Palace
Hotel in San Francisco on August 2, 1923. Only his wife, Florence, was
in the room when Harding died and it was rumored that she had poisoned
him.

It is a fact that at the moment Harding died Whitaker was playing
Factor across the steet. I discovered this myself when researching old
issues of the San Francisco Call Newspaper in the San Francisco Public
Library several years ago.

The only detail I am not certain of is that Whitaker killed Harding,
but it is not impossible that he did.

Sam Sloan
David Ames
2005-10-30 02:18:23 UTC
Permalink
Sam,

I read in an old book that you can kill a guy by pouring poison in his
ear. Is this how it was done?

David Ames
Catalan
2005-11-02 01:28:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Sloan
Why doesn't hasn't Tom Dorsch killed you?
Richard
Dear Richard,
The story I wrote is 100% true except for a few small details.
For example, it is 100% absolutely true that Tom Dorsch was an Army
Certified Sharpshooter
In your previous post you said he was a marksman. There is a difference
between the two asshole. Which is it?
Hiiiii!!! I'm Glinn Cambill!!!
2005-10-30 03:03:08 UTC
Permalink
On Oct 29, 2005, "Sam Sloan" blatherously upchucked nonsensical
gnatherblab, most likely a religious inoculation aimed at THEE
mental-midget masses, resulting in no insurmountable
brain damage to the logical thinker...
Post by Sam Sloan
The Absolutely 100% True Cross My Heart and Hope to Die True Story
about the death of JFK
<<< snipped all TRUE historical facts >>>
Post by Sam Sloan
[Event "Western Association Championship"]
[Site "San Francisco, Cal."]
[Date "1923.08.02"]
[White "Factor,Samuel D."]
[Black "Whitaker,Norman Tweed"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D64"]
1.d4 e6 2.Nf3 d5 3.c4 Nf6 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.Nc3 Be7 6.e3 O-O 7.Rc1 Re8
8.a3 c6 9.Qc2 a6 10.Bd3 dxc4 11.Bxc4 b5 12.Bd3 c5 13.Bxf6 Nxf6
14.dxc5 Bxc5 15.Ne4 Be7 16.Nxf6+ Bxf6 17.Bxh7+ Kh8 18.Be4 Rb8
19.O-O b4 20.Bc6 bxa3 21.Bxe8 axb2 22.Bxf7 bxc1=Q 23.Rxc1 Qd7
24.Qg6 Rb5 25.Be8 Rc5 26.Re1 Qd8 27.Ba4 Bb7 28.Bc2 Kg8 29.Qh7+
Kf8 30.Rd1 Rd5 31.Nd4 Bxd4 32.exd4 Qg5 33.f4 Qg4 34.h3 Qg3 35.Rd3
Qe1+ 36.Kh2 Qf2 37.Rg3 Qxd4 38.Qh8+ Ke7 39.Rxg7+ Kd6 40.Qb8+ Kc5
41.Rxb7 1-0
I think I will write a book proving all this and get a million ucks.
Ummm...is that "yucks" or "bucks"? -lmao...
Post by Sam Sloan
Sam Sloan
--
The consequences of my meager existence are only exacerbated by my need to
p*******e daily ~:O
micronerdo
2005-10-30 03:40:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Sloan
Whitaker poisoned Harding.
Means and Whitaker concocted a scheme to extort some money
from a wealthy heiress.
Whitaker was angry because Gaston B. Means had taken not only all the
money for the Lindbergh Kidnapping but for the Harding Assassination as
well.
Post by Sam Sloan
Hoover had paid Means for the Harding Assassination and Means was supposed
to give the money to Whitaker (naturally Hoover did not want to risk
being seen with a career criminal like Whitaker), but Means had kept
the money.
Whitaker was in touch with a notorious chess player, Thomas G. Dorsch.
Whitaker had met Dorsch at the 1961 US Open Chess Championship in San
Francisco. From 1923 until 1961, no US Open Chess Championship had
been held in San Francisco and it was almost a coincidence that after
a hiatus of 38 years, it was time for another US Open and also time to
kill another president. Whitaker returned to the scene of the crime,
meeting with Dorsch at the Mechanics Institute Chess Club and then
going across the street to the Palace Hotel to the very room where
President Harding had died, only to find that the walls had been
changed and the room remodeled on orders from J. Edgar Hoover.
Did Hoover eventually pay Whitaker for the Harding job....before the JFK
plot?
Or was the Harding job just a freebie?

Check!
Sam Sloan
2005-10-30 04:33:07 UTC
Permalink
Dorsch did not spend 20 years in the army, not by a long shot.
Mike
Are you certain of this? I have been thinking about this exact
subject.

I know for a fact that Tom Dorsch joined the US Army in 1964. I know
for a fact that he was trained at the Army Defense Language Institute
in Monterey California as a Russian Language Specialist.

The reason I am certain of this is that Dorsch lived in my apartment
from September 1963 until mid-1964. However, he did not pay his share
of the rent and ended up owing me about $300 in rent. I sued him in
Berkeley Small Claims Court. I got Tom Maser to serve the summons on
Dorsch while Dorsch was playing poker at the Key Club in Emeryville.
Dorsch filed an answer saying that he had joined the US Army and under
the Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act he was immune from suit. If
you look up in the old records of the Berkeley Civil Court you can
probably find the case.

By 1991 Dorsch was back in the Bay Area playing chess again. See:
http://www.uschess.org/msa/MbrDtlMain.php?10496730

That still gave Dorsch more than enough time to serve 20 years in the
military. I do not recall him ever playing tournament chess between
1964 and 1984, except that he played several times in the Armed Forces
Championship.

I do wonder why Dorsch was trained in Russian. Is his origin Polish?

Sam Sloan
Sam Sloan
2005-10-30 14:35:42 UTC
Permalink
Sam,
I think Dorsch left the army in 1968. He graduated from law school some
time in the 70s. He took the bar exam four times and failed it four times.
In the early 80s he took a job where I was working at the Social Security
Administration. He left that after several years. He never mentioned a
career in the army.
Mike
Thank you. I guess that I am mistaken then.

However, this subject has come up on the newsgroups several times in
the past when Dorsch was very active on the newsgroups as a policy
board member or as a candidate and Dorsch has never denied that he
served 20 years in the Army. He has also stated that he went to
Vietnam just to get away from Sam Sloan. Here is one example.

I posted this on October 5, 1999. Dorsch responded immediately, but he
did not deny the truth of any of these statements. he responded on
other points.

On Oct 5 1999, at 2:00 am Sam Sloan wrote:

"Tom Dorsch lived a few months in my apartment at 2119 Carleton Street

in Berkeley in the Fall of 1963 to the Spring of 1964. He only paid
one month's rent and he gave me a check for $372 which bounced.

"I took out a lawsuit against him for the bounced check, and got Tom
Maser, who is now a voting member of the USCF, to serve Dorsch with a
summons, which Maser served while Dorsch was playing in a 3-5 lowball
game at the Key Club in Emeryville.

"When the case came for trial in Berkeley Small Claims Court a few
weeks later, the court received a letter from the commanding officer
of Tom Dorsch saying that since Dorsch was in the Army, he was exempt
from a lawsuit under the Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act.

"What I did not know was that Dorsch had joined the Army just to get
out of my lawsuit. In 1994, a full 30 years later, I arrived in the
apartment of Elliott Winslow in New York, who was in the middle of an
interactive Internet chat with Tom Dorsch, and Winslow mentioned to
Dorsch that I had just arrived. Dorsch said, "You mean to say that
they let Sam loose?" Dorsch went on to say that it was because of Sam
Sloan that he had fled to Vietnam. Dorsch also mentioned the 1964
lawsuit in his chat with Winslow, while I was sitting next to
Winslow's computer in 1994.

"From 1964 to 1992, I never saw Tom Dorsch. I know that after he
joined the Army in the Spring of 1964, he went to the Army Defense
Language School in Monterey and became a specialist in Russian and
later went to Viet Nam for some CIA related work. However, that is all
I know about him, except that he played for the Army in several Armed
Forces Chess Championships.

"Except for those Armed Forces tournaments, Dorsch was not heard from
again in chess for about 20 years, although I might be mistaken
because I am not sure.

"Sam Sloan"
Sam Sloan
2005-10-30 05:19:35 UTC
Permalink
Sam just one question: After my game with Arnold Denker at the 1982
Wandering Knight Open (I won a nice ending, incidentally), I chatted
with him for about an hour. I asked him who was the most
extraordinary character he had met in his chess career. He quickly
responded, Norman Whitaker. Now, you can read several colorful
anecdotes about this Runyonesque conman in The Bobby Fischer I Knew
and Other Stories. But, Denker said that you couldn't believe a
single word that came out of Whitaker's mouth. Why would you lend
any credence to such a fantastic farrago of blarney as the tale you
shared with us? Warren Harding a healthy man? Only if you consider
an enlarged heart and dangerously high blood pressure indicators of
good health.
Norman Whitaker driving the getaway car in Dallas? I mean, he was
73, you know.
A wildly entertaining tale, but the chances of it being true are
very close to zero.
Ron
Thank you for sharing this observation with us. I had almost forgotten
that you used to be a chess master and have a USCF chess rating over
2200.

You are quite correct that Whitaker was a most unreliable source of
information. In addition, because of his long life span, it was
usually impossible to verify anything he said. For example, he would
talk about something that happened in 1910, but how were we to know
whether it was true or not. He wrote in an article published in Chess
Life in 1969 that he had been president of the National Chess
Association in 1926. I believe that this was probably true, but no way
to verify it. I believe that he wrote that he had beaten Reshevsky
three times in tournament games. I am certain that he beat Reshevsky
at least once. I do not know about the other two times.

I have been trying to think back and recollect the conversation we had
in 1962. It has been years since I thought about this. First I was
trying to remember what year it was. Now, I am certain it was 1962.
The reason is I remember that Whitaker was on crutches because of the
automobile accident in which Hartleb had been killed in 1961. I never
played tournament chess in North Carolina after 1962, so it must have
been in 1962. Now, I am trying to remember the city. I remember that I
played in two tournaments in North Carolina in the Summer of 1962. In
the last round of both tournaments I had a time pressure dispute with
a player named Peter Gamm. I do not remember how the disputes were
resolved, but I remember there was a lot of yelling and screaming. One
was the Queen City Open in Charlotte. The other I believe was in
Raleigh. I believe that Whitaker drove me part way to Lynchburg from
the tournament in Raleigh. He dropped me off, as he was going to
Washington DC.

I believe but I am not certain that I got up the nerve to ask him the
question of what had happened to the money from the Lindbergh
Kidnapping. I believe but again I am not certain that his answer was
that he never had the money.

I did not believe him at the time, but now I do believe that in
reality Whitaker never actually had the money in his hands. If he had
ever had the money, he would not have given it to Means.

By the way, for those outsiders who do not know, it is really a true
and well-known fact that Whitaker actually did have a side connection
with the Lindbergh Kidnapping.

Perhaps you are wondering, if I remember such things so well and in
such great detail even though they happened 43 years ago, why cannot I
remember exactly what Whitaker said. I do not know the answer myself.
I have had to think for a long time even to remember that it was
definitely in 1962 that Whitaker gave me the ride back. Perhaps I was
tired from a long chess tournament, riding in a car late at night, and
having to contemplate hitchhiking all night home to Lynchburg, that I
was not totally focused on what Whitaker was saying and therefore I
cannot remember his exact words.

Sam Sloan
Catalan
2005-11-02 01:33:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Sloan
I have had to think for a long time even to remember that it was
definitely in 1962 that Whitaker gave me the ride back.
I'll bet he gave you the ride of your life.
Sam Sloan
2005-10-30 05:44:29 UTC
Permalink
Sam, if you make ridiculous claims no one will ever again take anything you
say seriously. I suggest you focus on chess politics
(what you seem best at), and not try to revise a chapter of American history
that has already been extensively analyzed. However, if you can make a
million dollars promoting your theory, I'll be happy to type and edit the
manuscript of your book for a percentage of the take. Just be prepared for
a libel lawsuit from TD. Maybe you can argue in front of the Supreme Court
again and make history instead of changing it.
Just to let you know, within the past few hours, a publisher has
offered to publish my manuscript, so I do not need to cut you in for
half.

Also to let you know, Tom Dorsch cannot sue me because for the past
eight years in hundreds of chess newsgroup postings Dorsch has accused
me of some improper relationship with Whitaker. I do not know if
Dorsch is deliberately lying or if he simply has a faulty recollection
of what I told him about Whitaker in 1963.

The truth is that the only time I ever went anywhere with Whitaker was
after the 1962 chess tournament which I believe was in Raleigh in
which Whitaker drove me about 50 miles part way home to Lynchburg.

Whitaker offered to take me to the 1961 US Open in San Francisco, but
I declined.

All I am doing now is dishing back to Dorsch all the false statements
Dorsch has been making about me over the past eight years.

Sam Sloan
Sam Sloan
2005-10-30 16:06:22 UTC
Permalink
After his release from prison, Whitaker once again became one of the
top chess players in America...
Reshevsky, Fine, Kashdan, Bisguier, Horowitz, Evans, WHITAKER?!? --
Neil Brennen
GM Larry Evans once told me Whitaker had such a big ego that he was
trying to arrange a title match with Max Euwe to fill the void left by
the death of Alekhine in 1946.
Top is a relative term. Sam Sloan is one of the top chess players in
the United States because there are 20 million chess players in the
United States and Sam Sloan is in the top 5,000.

However, I can easily defend my statement that when Whitaker got out
of Alcatraz Prison he was once again one of the top chess players in
the United States.

Whitaker got out in 1947. The reason I remember this is that there was
a very important letter to the editor in Chess Life a few years ago.
The letter writer was one of the organizers to the 1947 US Open in
Corpus Cristi, Texas. He wrote that while the tournament was being
organized word was received from the President of the USCF that
Whitaker had just gotten out of Alcatraz and he was in the process of
driving his car from San Francisco to Corpus Christi, Texas to play in
the US Open Chess Championship. The president of the USCF instructed
the organizers of the US Open that this man was a criminal and
therefore he should not be allowed to play.

However, the organizers held a meeting and decided that if this man
has served 14 years on Alcatraz Island, then he has paid his debt to
society and therefore he should be allowed to play chess.

I am 100% certain that this was about the US Open in Corpus Cristi,
which was held in 1947

In 1947, Larry Evans was only 15 years old and Whitaker, who was rated
2420 by Elo, was still probably better. Even in 1960, a rating of 2420
was enough to put a player in the top 12 in the US and get him into
the US Closed Championship. In 1947, with the exception of Reshevsky,
Fine, Denker, Kashdan, Kupchik and Horowitz and perhaps one or two
others I doubt there was anybody better than Whitaker.

Another question is in about 1906 Whitaker played two matches with
Jackson Showalter, who was US Champion at the time. Showalter won.
Were these matches for the US Championship? Does anybody know?

Sam Sloan
Taylor Kingston
2005-10-30 18:06:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Sloan
However, I can easily defend my statement that when Whitaker got out
of Alcatraz Prison he was once again one of the top chess players in
the United States.
Whitaker got out in 1947.
False. Whitaker was released from Alcatraz in very late December 1936
or very early January 1937. In Hilbert's biography, I see no mention of
Whitaker serving prison time in 1947. He was convicted of sending
morphine through the US mail in 1944. For that crime he was imprisoned
in the Federal Corrections Institution at Milan, Michigan -- not in
Alcatraz. He was released from Milan in March 1946.
Post by Sam Sloan
The reason I remember this is that there was
a very important letter to the editor in Chess Life a few years ago.
The letter writer was one of the organizers to the 1947 US Open in
Corpus Cristi, Texas. He wrote that while the tournament was being
organized word was received from the President of the USCF that
Whitaker had just gotten out of Alcatraz and he was in the process of
driving his car from San Francisco to Corpus Christi, Texas to play in
the US Open Chess Championship. The president of the USCF instructed
the organizers of the US Open that this man was a criminal and
therefore he should not be allowed to play.
However, the organizers held a meeting and decided that if this man
has served 14 years on Alcatraz Island, then he has paid his debt to
society and therefore he should be allowed to play chess.
Your memory is clearly at odds with the facts.
Post by Sam Sloan
I am 100% certain that this was about the US Open in Corpus Cristi,
which was held in 1947
Hilbert says the 1947 US Open was in Fort Worth.
Post by Sam Sloan
In 1947, Larry Evans was only 15 years old and Whitaker, who was rated
2420 by Elo, was still probably better.
Nonsense. 2420 was Whitaker's estimated *peak* Elo. His peak period
was somewhere around 1921-1930. By 1947 he was in definite decline. On
the first USCF rating list, his Elo was 2245, not even NM strength (the
master threshold was then 2300); by 1951 he fell to 2180. The Evans of
that time would have cleaned his clock.
Post by Sam Sloan
Even in 1960, a rating of 2420
was enough to put a player in the top 12 in the US and get him into
the US Closed Championship. In 1947, with the exception of Reshevsky,
Fine, Denker, Kashdan, Kupchik and Horowitz and perhaps one or two
others I doubt there was anybody better than Whitaker.
Then he must have gone downhill *awfully* fast, since in August 1948
he finished 16th out of 20 in the US Championship, behind Steiner,
Kashdan, Kramer, Ulvestad, Hesse, Rubinow, Shainswit, Adams, Evans,
Shipman, Sandrin, Santasiere, Poschel, Platz, and Heitner.
Post by Sam Sloan
Another question is in about 1906 Whitaker played two matches with
Jackson Showalter, who was US Champion at the time. Showalter won.
Sam, when you get something wrong, you really go whole hog. Whitaker
did play two matches with Showalter, but in 1916 (S won 6-1) and 1918
(W won 5½-2½).
Post by Sam Sloan
Were these matches for the US Championship? Does anybody know?
The US title was not at stake in either, Marshall having won the
title in 1909.
Sam Sloan
2006-07-10 15:55:43 UTC
Permalink
This turns out to be one of my most popular articles.

By popular demand I am herewith posting a link to it.

Sam Sloan
Chris Mattern
2006-07-10 17:56:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Sloan
This turns out to be one of my most popular articles.
By popular demand I am herewith posting a link to it.
Sam Sloan
Good God, the Men in Black stole the link!


Chris Mattern

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